Where TSA agents have tested positive for coronavirus (MAP)

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This post is being updated every few days so that readers and travelers will know which airport security spots have had recent cases of coronavirus found with TSA screeners (cases found in the past 14 days).  

3/29/20 Update:

There are now twice as many cases of coronavirus found in TSA agents. The map below has been changed to reflect the new cases.

The TSA states that:

In the past 14 days across the nation, there are 52 TSA screening officers who have tested positive for COVID-19. In addition, 21 non-screening employees who have relatively limited interaction with the traveling public, have tested positive for the virus over the same period.

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3/24/20 Update: more TSA agents have now tested positive.

The TSA website states:

In the past 14 days across the nation, there are 24 TSA screening officers who have tested positive for COVID-19. In addition, 7 non-screening employees who have relatively limited interaction with the traveling public, have tested positive for the virus over the same period.

See the map below for the most updated locations.

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Original Article 3/21/20:

The coronavirus is on everyone’s mind right now but especially travelers.

Many people are nervous that they could come into contact with the virus when traveling via public transportation or planes or when staying in hotels. But there is another potential point of contact that is a concern now and that is coming into contact with TSA agents.

In many different airports around the country, TSA agents have tested positive for the COVID-19 virus.

This is worrying because TSA agents have no choice but to come into close proximity with travelers in order to perform their duties.

Whether it is simply marking off a boarding pass or performing a pat down, they will be required to come within the 6 foot radius of an individual. What’s more, they will then be coming into contact with your belongings as they get passed through x-ray machines.

The coronavirus can stay alive for hours in the air and up to three days on certain materials so this is very troubling. 

TSA states that “TSA is working with the CDC and state and local health departments to monitor local situations as well as the health and safety of our employees and the traveling public.”

In order to make things easier on the public, they have published a map of states where TSA agents have tested positive for the virus. States with a blue highlight indicate that an agent tested positive in that state and the yellow circle is the location of the airport where the agent worked.

You can also check to see exactly which airport and security point that the infected agent was working on and the last date that they were there as well as the shift that they were working during. It’s a very well-done chart.

For example, you can see that there was an infection at Atlanta-Hartsfield International Airport (ATL) by a screening officer on March 16 at the North Terminal Checkpoint from 10 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

This could be extremely helpful in helping to encourage travelers to self quarantine out of caution if they were to have traveled through the airport check points during that time.

If a security checkpoint is impacted, it may be closed and TSA will likely re-direct you to another security screening checkpoint. TSA reiterates that “TSA officers remain dedicated to their mission to ensure that travelers can get to their destinations as safely and securely as possible.”

H/T: TSA

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